10 tips to help children of all ages learn to love housework

10 tips to help children of all ages learn to love housework

What mom or dad hasn’t wished for a magical nanny to teach children to tidy happily, while singing? Unfortunately, no such magic exists, and parents often struggle with their children to do household chores.


Jennifer Chung is a parenting expert and co-founder of an online community focusing on health. She trained her 3-year-old to tidy and provides a helpful list of age-appropriate methods for other parents to try. You’ll be swept away when you test these tips at home.

1. When kids are as young as 18 months old, toys overtake the house. At this age they also want to be a helper. Jennifer suggests taking advantage of their desire to please you. “Before naptime and bath time, ask them to be your helper. Model putting books back on shelves and putting toys away. Make a big deal about how proud you are of their work. Give them applause. I like to use stickers as rewards, too.”

2. Set a routine for when chores get done in your home. “Whatever you choose, be consistent,” Jennifer adds. “For instance, making beds before school each morning may be your standard. Make your bed, then help your child. Keep in mind that a 3-yearold's skill level will not match that of an older sibling.”

3. As kids hit elementary school, an allowance may provide incentive to get them more involved, Jennifer admits. “Create a chores chart for each week and assign small tasks to everyone in the family. Put a check mark in each slot where chores were satisfactorily completed. Deduct a percentage for each day chores were missed or done sloppily.”

4. Television and video games can rule a teen's life. Jennifer suggests that parents provide a window of time for completing chores. When chores aren’t done without a fight, deduct time from their “free time” until they cooperate.

5. No matter the age, chores shouldn’t be used as a punishment for bad behavior. “Helping with household tasks teaches kids responsibility and work ethic. Housework is a necessary part of life.”

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6. But cleaning doesn’t have to be drudgery. “Put on music with a great dance beat. Playing music makes cleaning seem like a party. It will become a routine they’ll look forward to doing.”

7. Make a contest out of who can get their chores done first, Jennifer advises parents. “Some light-hearted competition makes housework less boring.”

8. Clean in short bursts to make the task less daunting.
“For example, using a timer set for 15 minutes lets everyone know they don’t have to clean forever. Select tasks you know can be done quickly. If the chores aren’t done, take a short break and work for another 15 minutes.”

9. Another game strategy is to hold a treasure hunt. “Hide money for children to find. Put the money in unsuspecting places like under their bed, on the bottom of furniture, or taped to the vacuum handle.”

10. Finally, Jennifer says to rotate tasks between children. “This not only keeps them from getting bored; it teaches younger children new skills. Kids will feel more grown up when they get promoted to a new set of responsibilities.”

Children of all ages will appreciate it if a fun activity is planned for everyone once chores are completed. Even parents need a little something special after a hard day’s work.



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If the kids see the parents do the chores themselves, they'll know it's a normal thing to do then they'll also do it.

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rhian20

rhian20

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might help to my boys.. thanks for the tips :)

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This helps a lot! Thanks! ;)

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Good one! Very helpful��

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Thanks for these helpful tips.

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